View Bulletin KNOB 105 (2006) 3

H. Hundertmark: De Utrechtse Buurtoren, een tijdelijke spits voor eeuwig. W. Annema en G. de Moor: Twee concept-bestekken uit 1538 voor de bouw van een kap op een kloosterkerk te IJsselstein. Johann-Christian Klamt: Romanische Skulptur in Maastricht kritisch besehen.

Gepubliceerd: 2006-06-01

Artikelen

  • The present Buurtower has a Romanesque predecessor, the foundations of which were excavated in 1933. The place of this disappeared tower is still recognizable. The tower used to stand to the east of the present one. In the present church nave its place can be recognized by the rhythmical interruption of the columns and a definitely larger vault panel. In 1370 the building of the present Gothic tower had started, but in 1380 it was interrupted when the tower structure had reached a height of 17 meters. This building freeze is still recognizable by the different use of the natural stones...

  • Until 1577 there was a monastery of the Cistercian order in IJsselstein. It had been founded by the local lords in 1342. Subsequently, the buildings were destroyed several times by acts of war. In 1495 a new complex was founded within the town walls in Benschopperstraat. Part of this survived and was restored in 1984. During the building of the church, part of the complex was burnt down, among which the monastery church. After fund-raising the reconstruction could start in 1539.

    Within this scope specifications were made for the construction of a roof on the church. Preparatory...

  • The Romanesque sculpture in Maastricht, particularly in the St.-Servaas church and the O.L.Vrouwekerk (Our Lady's church), has been extensively and learnedly discussed by Elizabeth den Hartog. At first iconological and iconographical problems are dealt with. Against the background of historical and political developments Den Hartog has drawn conclusions that are not always shared by the reviewer. He makes critical comments on Den Hartog's interpretations and sometimes suggests different solutions. He also manages to supplement Den Hartog's line of reasoning by pointing to other monuments...