View Bulletin KNOB 109 (2010) 5

Ten geleide: Twee eeuwen Koninklijke paleizen (Rob van der Laarse). Corjan van der Peet: Soestdijk, een vorstelijke decor. Rob van der Laarse: Koninklijk erfgoed van het verlies. Het Haagse Willemsparkhof in negentiende-eeuwse Europese context. Hanneke Ronnes: Authenticiteit en authenticiteitsbeleving: de presentatie en receptie van museum Paleis Het Loo.

Gepubliceerd: 2010-10-01

Redactioneel

Artikelen

  • Until 2004 Soestdijk Palace was one of the residences of the Oranje-Nassau family. Although the building appeals to one's imagination, until recently no profound research into the complex and its furnishing was carried out. Recently much new information has become available. This article gives a broad outline of the history and character of the palace, notably of the main building. The foundation of the country house in the 17th century was the work of the Amsterdam patrician family De Graeff. Possibly, the remains of the then built house are still to be found in the heart of the palace....

  • In contrast to other European countries 19 th century-court architecture in the Netherlands has not left a strong imprint on public memory. Just as most historical cities, most palaces in the Netherlands were restored in 17 th century Dutch Classicist Style, suggesting that after the Golden Age nothing happened. This article shows that such an impression is misleading. Focusing on the new monarchy of the Restoration era (1813-1848) it becomes clear that the first Orange kings William I and II started impressive building campaigns in both the Southern and Northern Netherlands, comparable...

  • By means of two case studies this article centres on the question of authenticity in both the presentation and the reception of museum Het Loo. The restoration of the palace in the years 1977-1984 meant a return to the 17th century-situation, leading to the destruction of various later additions. The house was unplastered, lowered by one storey and refenestrated; the landscape garden was removed and replaced by a copy of the original classical garden. The less than enthusiastic responses can be explained - at least in part - by the fact that this was already an old-fashioned restoration...